Busting the Top Fostering Myths!

Busting the Top Fostering Myths!

Cornerways Fostering has come up with some answers to dispel common myths!

Fostering Myth 1: I’d love to foster but I can’t afford to
You do not have to be well off to foster children. Fostering is an amazing thing to do for young people, but it is not charity. As an approved foster carer you will be paid a fostering allowance, which covers the extra household and general costs of having a young person living with you, any special expenses involved in their care and rewards your work as a professional foster carer.

Fostering Myth 2: I’d love to foster but I’m too old (or too young)
If you’ve got enough energy to foster lively children, then you are not too old to foster! Legally there are no upper age limits on fostering, and many people come to fostering a little later in life, after their children have left home for example. On the other hand, if you’re under 30 but can demonstrate you have the experience, commitment and dedication to foster young people then you’re not too young to foster!

Fostering Myth 3: I’d love to foster but I don’t own my own home
Foster carers do not need to own their own home. Whether you have a mortgage, or are a private or council tenant makes no difference to your ability to give a young person a safe, secure and loving place to call home.

Fostering Myth 4: I’d love to foster but I’m single or gay or male
You don’t have to be married to foster. You don’t even have to be part of a couple! You may be male or female, gay, heterosexual, bisexual or asexual. It’s not your couple status, gender or sexuality that is important but your ability to meet a young person’s needs.

Fostering Myth 5: I’d love to foster but I’m not a parent
You don’t need to have had your own children to foster. You may have gained experience through caring for your own children, through caring for young people in your extended family or friend’s network, or through working with young people as part of your job.

Fostering Myth 6: I’d love to foster but I don’t want to give up work
Depending on your circumstances you can sometimes foster and continue to work. Many people manage to successfully combine a job with their responsibilities as a foster carer, and if this is what you want to do you should not let it prevent you from applying to foster.

Fostering Myth 7: I would love to foster but I can’t do it all the time
Fostering can be respite care for children, either to cover a holiday period for the main carer or regular weekend/overnight respite. You can also help a vulnerable parent to learn to parent their young baby (parent and baby placed together in the foster home) and these are usually short placements for assessment of the parenting skills.

For more detailed information, click here or call 01293 826830.