Category Archives: All Posts

The children of St Paul’s Primary School in Thames Ditton worked together to win first place overall at the Esher District Sports competition held on 4 July 2019.

St. Paul’s took 1st Place in Field Events and 2nd Place in Track Events to win the Championship trophy for the overall competition beating ten other local schools. Congratulations to the students who individually achieved:

  • Year 3 girls: 1st Place long distance, 1st place sprint,
  • Year 4 girls: 1st place ball throw, 2nd place long distance
  • Year 3/4 girls 1st place relay team
  • Year 5 Girls: 1st place high jump, 3rd place ball throw
  • Year 5 Boys: 2nd place long jump, 3rd place ball throw
  • Year 6 Girls: 1st place ball throw, 2nd place long jump, 3rd place sprint
  • Year 5/6 Girls: 2nd place relay team
  • Year 6 Boys: 1st place sprint, 1st place long jump, 3rd place long distance

“They were both gracious in winning and magnanimous in defeat. They supported each other and often ran alongside those competing, cheering their team mates on,” commented one parent. Another parent noted that St. Paul’s was the only school to gather in a circle and in arms before competing.

Headteacher Mrs Olivia DeMorais said “I am phenomenally proud of the children and all they have achieved; their determination, resilience and supportive nature shines through in all they do. The sense of the strong community of St Paul’s is palpable at events such as these, and I am honoured to work with such wonderful pupils and parents”

Miss McDonald, Head of PE for St. Paul’s, said “I’ve enjoyed both supporting participation and providing opportunity for competition across all of the year groups. I’m working to ensure that sport is embedded in the life of the school.”

Huge congratulations to all the St. Paul’s pupils for their tremendous achievements and to all of the staff and parents who supported the event.

 

The Nomad Theatre has been named the winner of the Best Amateur Theatre Company in the 2019 Essential Surrey Awards, “designed to celebrate the best our county has to offer”.

The website and magazine readers voted in their thousands – this East Horsley arts base has been providing top-quality theatre since 1934.

Chairman Andrew Hamel-Cooke said: “We are thrilled to have won this. We are very proud of our theatre. It’s here for the community -from those who take part, to those who run our pensioner lunch club. It’s wonderful to be noticed and a privilege to be part of such a team.

The Nomad Theatre Group is a long-established performing arts group, which has run since 1934. With the local community being a key focus, the theatre puts on performances presented by The Nomads, their youth group (The Nomes), Play In A Week and affiliated groups. The rebuilding of the theatre itself was the result of a £1.3m grant from the National Lottery, which was supplemented by the group’s own fundraising and completed in 1998.

This award is the second announced in 2019, as The Nomads also celebrate winning “Best Drama” by NODA (South East – https://www.noda.org.uk/regions/south-east/celebration-day-2019-documents – see https://www.noda.org.uk/_assets/ckfinder_library/files/RegionalAwardWinnersandRunnersUpFor2018-Final.xlsx) for the production of A Christmas Carol in December 2018. The presentation ceremony will take place at the next Club Night on Saturday 20th July.

2019 also sees the return of Surrey Showcase (www.surreyshowcase.co.uk) at the theatre in August – a one-day performing arts festival celebrating the best talent Surrey has to offer, presented in partnership with Brooklands Radio. And on top of that, it’s a pantomime year and The Nomads present Jack & The Beanstalk.

Ripley Court School in Ripley have announced that they have agreed with Reed’s School that Ripley Court School will merge into Reed’s School.

Ripley Court and Reed’s have worked together for many years and share a philosophy of education which focusses on developing the whole child within a nurturing environment. The Board of Governors of both schools believe that this proposed merger is a natural extension of this strong relationship. It will allow both schools to benefit from a combination of outstanding staff and facilities whilst retaining the heritage and current structure of each school.

The intention is for Ripley Court to merge into the existing Reed’s School charitable framework, but the two schools will maintain their names, identity, location, structure and admissions process.

Ripley Court will remain co-educational for children from 3-13 and will continue to fully support all their pupils, both girls and boys, for a wide variety of senior school choices by preparing them for their entrance exams.

Reed’s will remain all-boys from 11-16 with a co-educational Sixth Form with around 700 pupils on its roll and will continue to admit pupils from a wide variety of schools.

This marks an exciting time for both Schools, for the parents and, most importantly, for the pupils.

Gavin Ryan, Acting Head of Ripley Court School, commented, “This is an exciting time in Ripley Court’s 125 year history and I am looking forward to leading our staff team, while working in partnership with Reed’s, to ensure we continue to provide an excellent, well-rounded educational experience for all our pupils. School life at Ripley, like at Reed’s, is about delivering a breadth of experiences and opportunities enabling children to unlock their true potential. This significant collaboration will ensure we focus on what makes us great while benefiting from extra facilities, expertise and experience.”

The Chairman of Governors at Ripley Court School, John Evans, added, “I am personally delighted that we are merging into the Reed’s School family. It provides a huge opportunity for Ripley Court pupils and staff. The Schools are a perfect fit in terms of ethos and approach to the education of young people.”

Commenting on the decision, Mark Hoskins, Headmaster of Reed’s School said, “Reed’s School was founded in 1813 as a school for orphan children and the central mission to support disadvantaged children has continued to this day through our Foundation. I very much look forward to working with Ripley Court to consolidate this work and take both schools forward to preserve and improve the education and opportunities for the children in our care.”

According to new research carried out by YouGov ahead of Help for Heroes’ Bake for Heroes campaign (www.bakeforheroes.org.uk – the UK’s biggest bake sale from 22nd to 29th June), UK adults with 3+ children in their household are turning to baking as a way to deal with the stresses and strains of living with children.

Almost a quarter (24%) of those with 3 or more children in their household think baking is a great way to deal with stress and anxiety (41% higher than UK average of 17%). This drops to 19% for people with 2 children and to only 14% for those with 1 child in their household.

Help for Heroes commissioned the research to explore the link between well-being and baking after finding that baking and culinary therapy can be a useful tool to aid the recovery of those who have sustained life-changing injuries or illnesses.

Similarly, 18% of adults with 3+ children households think of baking as a way to escape the real world which is 80% above the average for the UK (10%).

However, adults with larger numbers of children in their households are not just baking for themselves, but to make others feel better too.  Sixty-one percent of bakers in 3+ children households have baked something for someone to cheer them up (27% above UK average of 48%),  and this drops to 51% for 2 children households and 48% for people with 1 child.

While the UK’s favourite sweet bake is a Lemon Drizzle Cake (voted for by 12% of UK adults), the humble chocolate brownie is the top bake for parents with 3+ kids with 17% of the vote.

David Martin, Head of Supporter Fundraising at Help for Heroes says, “We are calling on all parents to run a bake sale for Help for Heroes. Chocolate brownies are always a crowd pleaser, so just sign up to www.bakeforheroes.org.uk, get a free fundraising pack and encourage friends, family, colleagues and school friends to make, sell, buy and eat cake. Our research shows that they’ll feel great getting involved, especially when they know that every penny raised will provide vital support to our nation’s wounded heroes.”

If people want inspiration they can find a recipe for the UK’s favourite cake, Lemon Drizzle, here: https://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/media/443157/bake-for-heroes-rosie-dummer-recipe.pdf

If you are looking for something to keep your children busy during the long summer holidays then hurry down to your nearest Surrey library and sign them up to this year’s Summer Reading Challenge.

The theme is Space Chase and is an out-of-this-world adventure inspired by the 50th anniversary of the moon landing.  The Summer Reading Challenge is aimed at all 4–11 year olds, regardless of their reading ability and launches in your library on Saturday 13th July, finishing on Saturday 14th September.

This summer children will help our super space family, the Rockets, track down books nabbed by mischievous aliens! As they read library books, they will solve clues and collect special stickers to complete their mission folder. Can they find the aliens in time to save the day?

Come in and sign up, visit the library over the summer and read (or listen to) at least six library books. Children will collect special stickers and other rewards along the way – all for FREE at any Surrey library. They can read whatever they like – fact, fiction, joke books or poetry – from our excellent range. They can even borrow audio books and listen if they prefer. Taking part in the Summer Reading Challenge helps children to become more fluent, confident and happy readers.

Children will need to be a library member to take part.  It’s free to join but we do ask for proof of address and an adult guarantor. Most Surrey Libraries will also be running special children’s events over the Summer Reading Challenge so please check in your local branch for further details.

We’re looking forward to seeing you soon.

The Summer Reading Challenge is produced by The Reading Agency and delivered by libraries.

Illustrations © Adam Stower for The Reading Agency

Looking after someone – a close family member, other relative or friend – can be hard. Carers can find themselves overwhelmed at times, isolated and unsure where to go for help. But there is a whole host of support for carers in Surrey, including Action for Carers – supporting carers of all ages, right across the county.

And this June (10th-16th) we are recognising the role of Surrey’s 115,000 carers as part of Carers Week, working in partnership with Surrey County Council, Surrey and Borders NHS Foundation Trust and the Guilford Diocese. We all want to remind carers that they’re not alone – there is lots of help out there, and opportunities to connect with other people in similar positions, like Action for Carers’ friendly and welcoming support groups: https://www.actionforcarers.org.uk/events/action-carers-support-groups/ Or if your caring role means it’s hard to get out, you can find lots of free digital tools and resources on line www.surreycc.gov.uk/supportforcarers (use the free access code DGTL3562).

Action for Carers will be out and about across the county during the Week, sometimes in partnership with SCC and others, offering support, information, or just a friendly chat. We’d be pleased to see carers to talk about any help or advice they need. Please pop along to any of these events!

ALL WEEK – 10-14 June – Information stand at East Surrey Hospital (East Entrance).

ALL WEEK— 10-14 June – Information stand at St Peters Hospital.

ALL WEEK— 10-14 June – Information stand at Epsom District Hospital.

MONDAY 10 June — Armed Forces Carers ‘What’s out there for you?’, Ash Centre, Ash Hill Road, Ash GU12 5DP, 9.30am-12. For carers who are Armed Forces Personnel, Serving, Reservists, Veterans and their families, come and chat to us about the support and services available.

TUESDAY 11 June – Information stand at Frimley Park Hospital from 10am-12pm.

TUESDAY 11 June – Information stand at the Royal Surrey Hospital from 9am-2pm.

TUESDAY 11 June – Information, advice and support day, Farnham Hospital and Centre for Health Hale Road, Farnham GU9 9QL, from 10am-3pm.

WEDNESDAY 12 June — Information Stand at Caterham Dene Hospital.

WEDNESDAY 12 June – Information, advice and support stall, The Haslewey Centre, Lion Green, Haslemere.

THURSDAY 13 June – Meet the Carers Advisers, Cranleigh Market (outside the Co-op) 9.30am-1.30pm.

THURSDAY 13 June – Information, advice and support stall, Guildford Waitrose, York Road, Guildford, 11am-1pm.

THURSDAY 13 June – Information, advice and support stall, The Meadows in Sandhurst, 10am-2pm.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT

Barbara Cormie, Marketing and Communications Manager, Action for Carers Surrey

Mobile 07966 396217 | Email [email protected]

 

Oxshott, Surrey, 22 May 2019The Royal Kent School (RKS), Oxshott is planning several community events over the next year in the run up to the school’s official bicentenary on 16 October 2020.

As the nation gets ready to mark the 200-year anniversary of the birth of Queen Victoria on Friday 24 May, The Royal Kent School in Oxshott is busy making plans for a very royal celebration of their own. In 2020, the school will commemorate the founding of the school over 200 years ago.

Built in 1820, the school was named ‘Royal Kent’ as it was set up under the Patronage of Prince Leopold of Saxe-Coburg, who lived in nearby Claremont and his sister, the Duchess of Kent and mother to the future Queen Victoria.

Until the building of the current school in Oakshade Road in 1958, the school was located on Oxshott High Street, on the site of the present petrol station. The 1820 building continued to be used until long after World War II, but it became more and more difficult to maintain the building and ensure it was fit for purpose.

The present-day RKS has visible reminders of the original building in the shape of a plaque which reads, ’Royal Kent School Founded 1820’, and the bell from the turret on its roof. In keeping with tradition, the school still ring this bell each morning to start the school day!

An Oxshott Sunday school started in a barn of Birds Hill Farm in June 1818, and was perhaps the school’s true predecessor. Early in 1818, Reverend. T. Lewis, a minister at the Islington Congregational Union Chapel, received a letter deploring the ignorant and depraved state of the people of Oxshott, saying they were greatly in need of religious education.  A far cry from the more recent labelling of Oxshott as the most expensive village in England and the premier address for top footballers!

For nearly 200 years, RKS has stayed true to its roots and provides a supportive and caring environment, where children are empowered to become confident, happy learners who achieve their very best – academically, socially and in readiness for later life. The school’s core virtues of Wisdom, Dignity, Hope and Community serve as a framework for the school which was proud to be featured so prominently on the new village sign erected earlier this month following a community funded project.

A more recent development in the school’s community curriculum is RKS’s Raising Aspiration programme where the local Community, Governors, Parents and Alumni are invited into the school to share their life experience with the children.

Miss Katie Hancock, Headmistress of RKS said ‘In readiness for the bi centenary preparations, the school would love to hear from more RKS Alumni willing to share their favourite memories of the school and other experiences.  Any donations of Royal Kent School memorabilia and historical documents to add to the school’s existing collection would also be gratefully received and help make this royal celebration even more memorable for the school and the community’.

For more information, please visit www.royal-kent.surrey.sch.uk/our-school/our-history-and-alumni.

 

 

Joining Surrey Artists’ Open Studios ‘Thames trail’

As Artist in Residence during 2018 Helen Locke has documented the daily life of Ochre Print Studio, in Guildford – from disability workshops to the screen stretching process of Ochre’s partner AD Colour in Shepperton. After a successful show at the Lightbox in Woking, The Riverhouse Barn in Walton-on-Thames plays host to textile art pieces and large scale prints celebrating Ochre and the people who use it. You can also learn how to use heat transfer inks to create your own artists apron at a workshop on Saturday June 15th. Contact the Riverhouse Barn to book.

This exhibition is part of Surrey Artists’ Open Studios and you can visit other artists as part of the ‘Thames Trail’. There will be a silent auction of art, sculpture and jewellery donated by the Thames Trail artists in support of Anthony Nolan. Bidding kicks off at the Private View on Thursday June 6th from 6-8pm and ends on Sunday June 16th.

The exhibition runs from Wednesday 5th –Sunday June 16th

Private View Thursday June 6th 6-8pm.

The Robert Phillips Gallery, The Riverhouse Barn Arts Centre, Manor Road, Walton-on-Thames, Surrey. KT12 2PF www.riverhousebarn.co.uk

Wed, Fri and Sat: 10am – 4.00pm; Sunday: 11.00am – 4.00pm

Ochre Print Studio is the largest Open Access Print Studio in the South East. During 2018 Artist in Residence Helen Locke, who studied illustration at Liverpool and gained a Masters in Narrative Illustration at Brighton, spent a year documenting how the studio helps everyone from new graduates to practicing artists to extend their skills in print. The Robert Phillips Gallery at the Riverhouse Barn Arts Centre will be transformed by an exhibition of textile and print pieces which showcase all that Ochre has to offer.

Situated between Woking and Guildford as part of Lockwood Day Centre, Ochre provides community workshops for disability groups across the county. Artists can pay a monthly fee and use the printmaking facilities, store their work and make the most of specialist courses in everything from non-toxic etching to lino cutting and letterpress.

Ochre has four Open Access sessions a week for members, two of which are supported by the Artist in Residence scheme, where two artists submit a proposal for the chance to spend a year using the studio to develop their work in print.

Helen is a graduate of Liverpool John Moores University with a Masters in Illustration from Brighton, and after teaching and working as a technician is well suited to using these skills at Ochre. Her idea puts a spotlight on all that the studio has to offer: the tools of the printmaker; the sponsors AD Colour who repair the silk screens; artists who make up the teaching team; disability groups who use the print facilities; visiting and resident artists, by drawing them and collecting quotes ‘overheard on the studio’.

The unifying element of all activities at Ochre involve putting on an apron, and having worked primarily in the textile department of Alton College as a technician, Helen uses innovative methods to transfer expressive marks and documentary drawings onto different fabrics. Her first apron illustrates the Ochre Print Able group and combines colourful mark making using heat transfer paints, alongside screen printed drawings onto thick neoprene fabric.

The studio itself provides a wealth of imagery – the spray bottles used for cleaning make an exciting image when screen printed onto denim. Helen experiments with copper foiling (also using the heat press) making an apron which celebrates screen print with a nod to Andy Warhol.

Visiting Ochre sponsors AD Colour, Helen has spent a day recording the screen repair process, where silk screens are glued and stretched to the correct tension on a massive scale. Leaving the unit in Shepperton with armfuls of waste silk screen mesh, she has heat pressed, printed on and manipulated the fabric to create extravagantly pleated aprons fit for Grayson Perry. Helen used some neoprene to create utility bags featuring images from AD Colour – not all utilitarian items need to be dull…

The etching tools have made their way onto an apron, as have illustrations of participants of a collagraph workshop run by Katherine Jones. Finally Helen has created an enormous plate using ‘Environmount’ card to print a full scale paper apron to showcase the intaglio process.

The exhibition at the Riverhouse Barn re-creates the feel of Ochre studio, by providing a table and chairs at which you can browse Helen’s sketchbook form the year. There will be two workshops on Saturday June 15th where you can create your own apron – book at http://www.riverhousebarn.co.uk/

The exhibition forms just one stop (Studio 23) on the ‘Thames Trail’ as part of Surrey Artists’ Open Studios alongside: Tamara Williams (Studio 22); Katy Selwyn-Smith (Studio 24); Malcolm West (Studio 25); Hilary Jones and Tricia Baldwin (Studio 30) and the Stable Artists at Studio 32. All artists have given a piece of their fantastic work to a Silent Auction to raise funds for the Anthony Nolan. The charity saves the lives of people with blood cancer and blood disorders. http://anthonynolan.org/

 

 

 

 

Join thousands of people in the 30 Days Wild challenge this June

TV celebrity Matt Baker is urging Surrey residents to take part in the UK’s biggest nature challenge, 30 Days Wild. Inspired by the Trust’s work when filming Countryfile in Surrey last month, he is encouraging people to do something wild outside every day in June and get closer to nature.

The ever popular 30 Days Wild challenge is proven to make people healthier, happier and more likely to do something to help wildlife in their back gardens. Tens of thousands of Surrey residents took part last year and this year the Trust wants even more people to have fun and enjoy nature on their doorstep

What you decide to do is totally up to you, so you can fit it into the busiest day or the half term break.  You could lie down in the grass for some simple cloud spotting, spend family time by the river, admire the beautiful dragonflies, create a bucket pond at home or simply listen to birdsong on your way to school or work.

If you’re in need of inspiration, the Trust has plenty of ideas on the website, or you can generate daily ideas using their handy App.  Residents are also welcome to join Trust staff for some wild activities on Guildford High Street on 1st and 2nd June, including a large pop-up wildlife garden, face painting and wild beasties! There’s also free entry to the Wild Surrey Art and Photography Exhibition at Guildford House Gallery running from 25 May -16 June.

Some schools and local businesses are already planning their 30 Days Wild this year by organising wildlife gardening events, quizzes, nature walks, wild bake sales or picnics at lunchtime to encourage pupils and staff to get outside during the warmer weather.

Charlotte Magowan, Marketing and Communications Manager for Surrey Wildlife Trust, said: “30 Days Wild is the perfect excuse to just get out there every day and enjoy nature where we live.  Surrey’s countryside is incredible and it’s just too easy to get stuck in the hamster wheel of life and miss the beauty of the natural world.  Whether you decide to watch the sun go down, listen to a dawn chorus, take a meeting outside, feed the birds or take a video of a minibeast, we want everyone to get closer to nature.   It is only by experiencing nature that we recognise its value and realise how important it is to protect it.”

To sign up for 30 Days Wild visit wildlifetrusts.org/30dayswild where you will find all sorts of tips and inspiration.  Don’t forget to share all the things you do on social media using #30DaysWild! Matt Baker’s video on 30 Days Wild is here: www.surreywildlifetrust.org/30dayswild

Three quarters (75%) of parents worry about their children accessing – or inadvertently stumbling upon – inappropriate adult content online, according to new research.

 

The study of 1,500 parents, by leading age-verification provider, AgeChecked, found that websites containing pornographic material were the biggest concern for children’s safety and wellbeing. This was ahead of gambling platforms (51%) and shopping sites that sell restricted items such as knives and alcohol (40%).

 

The worrying impact of adult content on young people’s mental health was recently highlighted in a report by the NSPCC. The charity cited widespread confusion over what constitutes “normal” intimate activity as a cause for increasing peer sexual abuse. 

 

However, despite this clear need to safeguard minors against viewing inappropriate content online, fewer than half (43%) of the parents surveyed believe that current age restrictions in place are working effectively. 

 

Better online age checks form a key part of the Digital Economy Act, which will require the adult industry to check the age of all online users when it is implemented in April 2019. 

 

This is in addition to growing pressure on social media platforms to better regulate their content. The research found that 59% of children have used social media by the age of 10, even though many of these have a minimum age requirement of 14. 

 

Currently, the adult industry is able to promote explicit content via certain social platforms that are easily accessible by children. However, there is nothing within new Digital Economy Act regulations to stop sites from continuing to advertise their services in this way. 

 

Alastair Graham, CEO of AgeChecked, said: “Pressure is mounting for adult content providers to ensure they are operating entirely within the law. Although parents have a responsibility to protect their children, it’s almost impossible to constantly monitor exactly what they are doing online. The onus is therefore also on the adult industry to help safeguard young people.